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BBB Online logo Accurate Building Inspectors ® is a member of the American Society of Home Inspectors Accurate Building Inspectors ® is a member of the American Institute of Architects
Accurate Building Inspectors ® is a Division of Ubell Enterprises, Inc.

Licensed: New York (NY) & New Jersey (NJ)

Toll Free: 1-800-640-8285

1860 Bath Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11214-4616

Frequently Asked Questions
Building & Home Inspections

Questions & Answers

Get answers to common home inspection questions. For additional inquiries, please contact us. Thank you.

Part 1: Pre-Inspection Questions

a. What is the Pre-Inspection Agreement?
b. What is a home inspection?
c. Do you only inspect one family homes?
d. What is included in a home inspection?
e. How long should an inspection take?
f. What is the fee for a home or building inspection?
g. When can I schedule an inspection?

Part 2: Inspection Results

a. Should I be present at the inspection?
b. Why do I need a home inspection?
c. How long does it take to get a report?
d. Can a house fail an inspection?
e. What if the report reveals problems?

Part 3: General Information

a. Who is qualified to perform a home or building inspection?
b. What is The American Society Of Home Inspectors®?
c. Who belongs to ASHI®?
d. Are the inspectors of Accurate Building Inspectors® members of ASHI®?
e. What is the American Institute of Architects?
f. How long has Accurate Building Inspectors® been in business?
g. Where in the United States does ABI offer home & building inspections?
h. When should I hire a construction expert witness?

Part 1:
Pre-Inspection Questions

a. What is the Pre-Inspection Agreement?

The Pre-Inspection Agreement is a two page form explaining the provided services and limitations of a home and building inspection. All clients must sign, prior to each inspection, a Pre-Inspection Agreement issued for the County/State where the inspection is performed.

b. What is a home inspection?

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of a structure. Having a home inspected is like having a physician giving a physical check-up. If problems or symptoms are found, the inspector may recommend further evaluation.

c. Do you only inspect one family homes?

We inspect one and two family homes, multiple family buildings, dwellings of all sizes: Co-ops, Condos and penthouse apartments. Please review Accurate Building Inspectors® Home & Building Inspections Services. We provide pre-purchase home inspections and inspect residential and commercial buildings (from out-houses to skyscrapers).

d. What is included in a home inspection?

You will receive a fully typed written report, approximately 18 to 20 pages long. Our report (see the Home & Building Inspections sample report) will review the condition of the home's heating system, central air conditioning system (temperature permitting), plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic, and insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement, and all other visible and accessible areas of the building.

NOTE: Refrigerators, portable air-conditioners, dish washing machines, clothes washers & dryers, lighting fixtures, ranges and all electrical appliances are NOT evaluated during an inspection. They are considered personal items and are not part of the real property.

e. How long should an inspection take?

The average length of an inspection is 2 hours. Depending on the size for the property and the ease of movement throughout the building the inspection may take more or less time. Very large facilities could take several days.

f. What is the fee for a home or building inspection?

See the Fee Schedule for Home & Building Inspections. We accept credit cards as well as other Payment Methods.

g. When can I schedule an inspection?

Call today for an inspection as early as tomorrow. Home inspections need to be preformed prior to sunset. Regular business hours are weekdays from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time). Note that for weekends and holidays, there is a 50% surcharge for all inspections (Saturday, Sunday or Holidays) and a pre-credit or credit card deposit is required.

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Part 2:
Inspection Results

a. Should I be present at the inspection?

You should make every effort to attend and be prepared to ask questions during the inspection. Although it is not necessary for you to be present for the inspection, it is strongly recommended. You will be able to observe the inspector and ask questions directly. You will also find the written report easier to understand if you've seen the property first-hand through the inspector's eyes. As well, you will need to provide the inspector with a signed Pre-Inspection Agreement prior to the home or building inspection.

b. Why do I need a home inspection?

The purchase of a home is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. You should learn as much as you can about the condition of the property before you buy it. After the inspection, you will have a much clearer understanding of the property you are about to purchase.

c. How long does it take to get a report?

Two to three working days.

d. Can a house fail an inspection?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of your prospective home. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value, or a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its visible physical condition and indicate what may need repair or replacement.

e. What if the report reveals problems?

No building is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn't necessarily mean you shouldn't buy, only that you will know in advance what to expect. A seller may adjust the purchase price or contract terms if major problems are found. If your budget is tight, or if you don't wish to become involved in future repair work, this information will be extremely important to you.

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Part 3:
General Information

a. Who is qualified to perform a home or building inspection?


  1. Any qualified or certified individual should have at least 3 years training as a home or building inspector under the guidance of master inspector, architect or engineer.
  2. A person who has performed at least 100 inspections.
  3. The inspector should be a member of a profession home inspection organization such as the “American Society of Home Inspectors®”, (ASHI).
  4. Home or building inspectors should have state licensure or be a registered architect or licensed engineer.
  5. All inspectors and inspection firms should have professional liability and property damage insurance with coverage, not less than $500,000.00 each for a total of $1,000,000.00.

b. What is The American Society Of Home Inspectors®?

The American Society of Home Inspectors® (ASHI®) is the oldest and leading non-profit, professional association for independent home inspectors. Since its formation in 1976, (Alvin Ubell founder of Accurate Building Inspectors® was one of the founding charter members of ASHI®) ASHI's "Standards of Practice" have served as the home inspector's performance guideline, universally recognized and accepted by professional and government authorities alike. Copies of the Standards are available free from ASHI®.

ASHI's professional Code of Ethics prohibits Members from engaging in conflict of interest activities which might compromise their objectivity. This is the consumer's assurance that the inspector will not, for example, use the inspection to solicit or refer repair or construction work. Learn more about what to expect from a home inspector: ASHI Client Bill of Rights.

c. Who belongs to ASHI®?

Members of ASHI® are independent professional home inspectors who have met the most rigorous technical and experience requirements in effect today. ASHI Members are required to follow the Society's Code of Ethics, and to obtain continuing education credits in order to keep current with the latest in building technology, materials, and professional skills.

d. Are the inspectors of Accurate Building Inspectors® members of ASHI®?

Yes.

e. What is The American Institute of Architects?

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is the professional organization for architects in the United States. Organized in February 1857 in New York City, the Institute conducts various activities and programs to support the profession and enhance its public image, including periodically awarding the AIA Gold Medal to architects that create a significant body of work of lasting influence. Members include but not limited to Architects, Engineers and Associates. Review AIA Code of Ethics.

f. How long has Accurate Building Inspectors® been in business?

Since 1961.

g. Where in the United States does ABI offer home & building inspections?

ABI inspectors are licensed to provide inspections in New York, NYC and New Jersey, and have consulted on projects throughout the US and Canada. See the Service Area Map.

h. When should I hire a construction expert witness?

Engaging a construction expert witness early on is always in your and your client's best interest for the following reasons:

  1. An expert may need to render an opinion on what took place at the time of the incident.
  2. The expert may need to research standards, take photographs and measurement documentation, listing of contractors, access to site and construction dispute documents, etc.
  3. The expert may need to write a report on his or her findings during the investigation of the site, this should occur as soon as possible.
  4. An early investigation may reveal the lack of or the existence of evidence disclosing notice, constructive notice, cause and create.
  5. If time elapses, conditions can change, evidence may be destroyed, avoiding spoliation claims, (reconstruction of the exact conditions may not always be possible).
  6. A knowledgeable expert in legal procedures and protocols can help in discovery requests and answers to opposing requests.
  7. The expert can create a list of questions that could be asked at deposition.
  8. Aid in the support and/or opposition of a summary judgment.

To learn more, read: Expert Testimony in a Court Trial, Deposition or Hearing


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